Eye Care Question of the Week: #7

Question:

Are there any alternatives to laser eye surgery?

Answer:

If you have been seriously contemplating going for laser eye surgery then this is an important question to ask yourself. This topic is also of interest for anyone who has already inquired about refractive surgery options but has been denied for any number of reasons: age, unstable prescription, thin corneas, high farsightedness or high nearsightedness, etc. Most patients who present to our clinic for a preliminary laser eye surgery consultation are looking to get away from eyeglasses. This may be for cosmetic reasons, lifestyle, or occupational requirements.  But do you know some of your alternatives?

One alternative to laser eye surgery is overnight or continuous wear contact lenses such as the Air Optix Night & Day by Ciba Vision. This product is one of the most studied contact lenses in the world and has a proven track record. For the right candidate this type of contact lens can offer excellent vision quality. Also, if your prescription changes you can quickly update your contact lens power as opposed to having to go through a laser eye surgery enhancement procedure. The other benefit of overnight contact lenses is that you know instantly how well you’re going to see, as there is no waiting period or healing time. From a financial perspective, an annual supply of these contact lenses is about one tenth the cost of laser eye procedures. On the downside however, there is still a small chance of developing an eye infection from sleeping in an overnight contact lens. Also, these contact lenses do not provide correction for astigmatism, which means that about 20% of patients are unable to wear them.

Another alternative to laser eye surgery is 1-Day disposable contact lenses, such as Dailies Aqua Comfort Plus or Acuvue TruEye. For many contact lens patients it’s simply the hassle of taking care of their contact lenses or forgetting when they last changed them. For these individuals a single use 1-Day disposable contact lens may be a great alternative. 1-Day disposable contact lenses also show a reduced prevalence of eye infections when compared to continuous wear overnight contact lenses or traditional 2-Week or 1-Month disposable contact lenses. These contact lenses may also be a great alternative for patients who suffer from dry eye syndrome and are not a candidate for overnight contact lens wear. Once again, an annual supply of these contact lenses are about one tenth the cost of laser eye surgery procedures, and your prescription can be quickly be updated.

To book a preliminary laser eye surgery consultation or to discuss some of your alternatives, please book an eye health examination with one of the optometrists at eye-bar.

 

eye-bar optometry in Sherwood Park - Eye Exams, Contact Lenses, Emergency Visits & Ophthalmology Referrals

Eye Care Question of the Week: #4

Question:

What is pink eye?

 

Answer:

Pink eye is a general term used to describe the appearance of a red swollen looking eye. An eye can become inflamed or ‘pink’ for a number of reasons including: allergies, viral and bacterial infections, chemical irritants, or because of an underlying disease process.

In general however, ‘pink eye’ is most often used to describe a viral eye infection. Viral eye infections are one of the most common eye infections that optometrists and ophthalmologists encounter. Patients often present with sinus infections, runny noses or other cold like symptoms. Eyes often take on a pinkish hue, water excessively and become light sensitive. Symptoms are usually the worst within the first 3-5 days, with most symptoms resolving within 1-2 weeks.

Because viral pink eye can be extremely contagious, therefore it must be detected and treated properly. Patients should not go to work, school, or day care until they visit an eye doctor to confirm the diagnosis.

 

eye-bar optometry - eye exams, contact lenses, emergency visits & ophthalmology referrals

Eye Care Question of the Week: #3

Question:

Do I really need an anti-reflective (AR) coating on my lenses?

 

Answer:

The bottom line is yes.  Anti-reflective coatings dramatically improve the performance of your new eyeglasses and the overall quality of your vision. 

Anti-reflective coatings help to prevent both internal and external optical reflections and they allow for increased light transmission through the lens. The result is brighter, clearer more natural feeling vision.

For patients with prescriptions that require thinner high index lenses, anti-reflective lenses become even more crucial as internal reflections are magnified.  These lenses are also easily scratched or damaged and require the additional scratch resistant benefit that anti-reflective coatings offer.

7 – Reasons to purchase anti-reflective lenses

  • Improved cosmetic appearance
  • Increased light transmission – Brighter vision
  • Improved contrast sensitivity – Fine detail vision
  • Reduced glare on the computer
  • Reduced glare for night time driving
  • Improved scratch resistance
  • Easier to clean

 

eye-bar optometry - eye exams, contact lenses, emergency visits & ophthalmology referrals

Eye Care Question of the Week: #2

Question:

How often should I have my eyes examined?

 

Answer:

One of the core beliefs behind eye-bar is that every patient wants to see they’re very best. However, far to often insurance plans, or government policies dictate our personal health care strategy. As Canadians, we also grew up believing that you only saw a doctor when you had a problem.

The concept of preventative health care however is starting to catch on across all areas of medicine. Research consistently shows us that early detection and diagnosis of medical problems helps to improve long term patient outcomes. Knowing your personal health and your risk factors empowers patients to make improved lifestyle choices.

So at eye-bar, we believe that everyone regardless of age should receive a comprehensive annual eye health examination. Annual eye exams by an eye doctor provide piece of mind, knowing that you truly are seeing your best and that your eyes are health.

 

eye-bar optometry – eye exams, contact lenses, emergency visits & ophthalmology referrals

 

Eye Care Question of the Week: #1

Question:

Can I wear soft contact lenses if I have astigmatism?

 

Answer:

Absolutely! Over the past 3-4 years contact lenses manufacturers have started to release some great new options and improved parameter ranges for patients with astigmatism. These new contact lenses feel better on the eye, and provider sharper more stable vision.

In the past, astigmatism contact lenses use to move around on the eye causing patients to have fluctuating vision. The contact lenses felt thick, and were usually more uncomfortable then standard contact lenses. This meant that a large number of patients were fit into standard contact lenses instead, resulting in satisfactory but less optimal vision correction. While many other patients were turned off of contact lenses all together. 

So if you’re interested in trying one of the new soft astigmatism contact lenses now available, please book a professional contact lens fitting with one of the eye doctors at eye-bar.

 

eye-bar optometry – eye exams, contact lenses, emergency visits & ophthalmology referrals